Lens Dev Blog Entry-Alec

I’ve yet to write one of these, so let’s kick this off. I’m Alec Asperslag, my main function on the team is art coordination. My duties involve facilitating communication from our main team (the people enrolled in the course) with our artists (many of whom are off-site). To that end, I run art scrum meetings multiple times a week and generally try to keep communication flowing between the people building levels and the people creating assets for those levels.

This week I’ve been trying to recruit. With only a few dedicated modelers, we’ve definitely hit a bit of an asset crunch. While many people on the team can model, most have other tasks they’d have to take time away from. We’re meeting with a few interested students in CMPS 25 (an intro level modeling class I tutor for) tomorrow, and talked to a few earlier this week, so hopefully we’ll have a few more modelers for Spring Quarter.

My two other tasks right now have been designing the Lens and getting a “playground” version of the plateau level implemented.

On the Lens, I’ve finally nailed down a design I and others are happy with.

Final_Lens_Glow

We’ve iterated through a lot of Lens ideas, but a few keep coming back to a few central qualities.  For one, we want it to look both magical and mechanical.  We wanted something that gave the player clear visual feedback.  We kept liking the idea of a device that fold up into a sphere.  Perhaps I’ll dedicate a post to this once the Lens is nearer completion, but for now I have a core design, which I’m beginning to model.

With the plateau, I’ve been working on Rifts, “tears in the world” that let the player enter the alternate universe for a short time.  Early on we came up with the idea that the alternate world had slightly lighter gravity.  From this I’ve been toying with the idea of “rift running” bounding between rifts as a method of traversal in certain portions of the game.   The “playground” arose as a scene to test this mechanic out (and as a palete cleanser after a weekend of intensive modeling), which is now being given a few touches to make it useful as we move into playtests.

-Alec